Tag Archives: #iceprince

Illegal Music III- MI Releases Tracklist

He announced the completion of the 3rd installment of the mix-tape series, Illegal Music(IM) via his twitter account and has whet the appetite of fans with the first single Everything off the anticipated mix-tape, where he revealed the emotional state he’s been after everything he’s learnt so far. It’s very philosophical.

On Wednesday MI Abaga  shared a screen shot of what would be the final track-list IM III- and its 10 tracks long.

IM3-Tracklist
KKK? No one seems to understand the note here.

The mix-tape has garnered this much follower-ship because of the level of creativity he injects into these projects, its sort of the place where he lets loose and say everything he couldn’t in a regular commercial album.

We can only wait the actual release of this project.

LOCAL RAPPERS THROWING BARS IN TRASH CANS AMONG OTHER THINGS

I couldn’t agree more with the article- paradigm shift by No BS as per rap scene in the industry of ours (jesse jags thinks we delude ourselves to ever call what we have an industry) disagree?  feel free-that’s a discuss for another day. As for the shift, it’s clear to see that the consumers have woken up to the content they really wanted, the unprecedented followership of Nigerian music alone is enough indicator of who’s king in the game (not king as in King James or King Kong) I mean king as per who’s winning-as reminisce rightly said in his recent single, local rappers; awon fans ti  jara won, won ti bo pampers, a track that featured Olamide another Yoruba spitting ‘rapper’ and then there’s the ingenuity of phyno, yes its hard already to speak Igbo as a language, but doing 16bars in just plain Ibo(well some English words are always embedded, not avoidable if you understand that some words don’t have Igbo translation like Lice, I mean rice) I must add here that though Olamide sometimes have his stellar moments it’s not the case this time around. But he doesn’t have to cry on this account cos even the author of the track himself wasn’t at his best, very weak flows when you compare to a similar track in his Alaga Ibile album- Government which also featured Olamide.

BREAKING NEWS- the Video for Eau De Vile-Dance Go has just dropped while I wrote this piece. Madam Adetiba did yet another wonderful montage. I was expecting a normal dance club video with a lot of nudity, but was pleasantly surprised by the story based and dramatic rendering of wizzy and 2face with a sleeping beauty that got woken by a single drop the masterfully blended cognac. Oh! the power of Hennie

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ICE PRINCE CANT RAP

Back to the discussion at hand, yes! The paradigm shift. There would be no shift if there never was a status quo. The rappers mentioned in the article including Eedris Abdlkareem, Mode 9 etc provided a launch pad for all these new generation rappers and the new gen rappers in turn are obliged to forever pay homage to these ‘intelligentsia’.  What however makes me loose it, is the fact that these veterans be telling the new gen they aren’t doing hip hop right (please reserve this advice for Ice prince zamani), speaking of which, I read somewhere MI had something to say as per NoBs’ take on his bro’s mixtape the trash can. Well Mr Abaga, let’s call a spade a spade, or more suitable in this case, let’s call a dustbin a garbage bin or ‘ile le’ as Yorubas say, because calling that mixtape a ‘trash can’ is derogatory to ‘trash cans’ hope I haven’t lost you? Alright then enough of the ‘trashy’ banta. A twip twitted that Don Jazzy has proved my article wrong- ‘Don Jazzy and his huge mavin gamble’ saying that he has started reaping the benefits of his newly signed artists. Collectively, well I won’t argue that the don is winning, and I never said he couldn’t pull it off, I just pointed out to him that it would be arduous. Ok yes, they have hits dorobucci and ada obi, but individually, you can hardly call di’ja or korede bello or banks successful solo artists, yet. This my friend, was the point I tried to drive home with that article.^ See you later guys, till I write again. Meanwhile you could follow me on twitter @shiznnitz if you care to read my ramblings on the inexistent industry as Jesse Jags pointed out.

KING KONG- VECTOR HINTS AT GANG AFFILIATION?

“Knocking on your door like ding ding dong” Vector takes his new single King Kong to the street, but nobody’s running for cover. Why? cos you’ll wanna dance! The beat is a medley of traditional African sound- the Udu, an instrument common and probably originating among the south eastern tribes of Nigeria, accompanied by staccato gong sound, with a flute to complete a nollywood flick soundtrack-esque.

After years of doing music the way he knows to do, with not as much commercial success as his counter-parts in the big record labels-Choc city(ice prince), Mavin(d’prince); He seems ready to commercialize ‘we tryna make money right? ka pawo die’.

There are punchlines to go on and on about, but the highlight of the song for me is his ingenuity on the color composition, creating a color themed chorus literally.

why you dey look me like cow head, chicago‘-(chicago bulls NBA team wear red and white uniform),

I dey generate power like mikano‘-(the white generator with a red insignia)

‘champion swagga omo na milan o’ (AC milan has a red and white away kit).

Whatever inspired this chorus  could be pointing at his affiliation to a fraternity, which he also mentioned in the song- the KK Mafia(Vikings), who have color codes as most gangs and fraternities and wear their tunics in red and white.

This may sound like a whole web of conspiracy, you know, sort of like the giants of renaissance art being affiliated to fraternities and leaving subtle clues in their creations. Well what do I know?

Watch here and listen yourself- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axrSSK3rw4w

Are Female Emcees Really Destined To Play Cameo In The Music Scene?

Let me begin by saying; this is not a paid hype or advert campaign for anybody, although some of you at the end of this post might think otherwise. I can’t deprive you of your opinion(s) (after-all isn’t all these write-ups’ someone’s observation?). That out of the way,  I feel the need to address the issue of Nigerian female rappers fading out of the music scene like its destined they’ll always play a cameo role in the industry. We see them drop 1 or 2 bangers (most aren’t even that dope, but we still show them love) and then they burn out. I know by now a few names have been popping into your heads. There are quite a number of them but I’ll mention a few and leave the rest to your imagination.

We start from the most visible female in the game, Sasha P right? almost a decade ago since she left da trybe before establishing herself as a solo artist with the hit single Ewa bami jo back in 2007, and then there was a long pause (radio static silence) in her career, before dropping Adara (the lead single to her First Lady album under storm records), where she voiced all her frustrations about not reaching the expectations of her fans. At least she had a better and smoother career as opposed to Blaise.

Although I loved blaise’s team-up with Jesse Jags and Ice prince on MI’s album in a song that interestingly was titled blaze. I think blaise-a trained architect, never saw music as a full time job, she probably had other source of income as she never got around the vocal booth often, and if she did sorry for the misconception but we were never given enough materials to think otherwise.

Kel…Kel…Kel…Kelechi Ohia, lets just leave it at that cos frankly there isn’t much to say about her. WA WA ALRIGHT.

More recent though there’s been some step-ups, the fair Munachi Abi (I mean fair as always used in medieval English, not light skin) oh yes I said beautiful and that isn’t an opinion, she was a beauty queen in 2007.You’ll think she probably got the idea of doing music professionally when she was going out with peter of p-square, but she’s been doing rap way before then.

BTW, was that a failed attempt for a publicity stunt when the dancing twins said they were calling the group quit?’ 

Muna appears on our TV screen more often for various other reasons other than rapping. She does rap in potois sometimes which I think is really cute, but not enough to get the fans star struck.

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Eva Alodiah

Another pretty and petit lady that does patois is Eva Alodiah, her song High  was impressive and she got my attention with it (I say that like my attention matters to her, lol). Anyways, the track deaf was for me the highest point of her career thus far, Ol’ up Ol’ up don’t tell me shit *in eva’s voice*. As much as I believe she has a very good rapping skill-word play is top notch, poised to be a successful rap sensation. However, here’s the deal she can’t sing. I think here is the one point where all of the afore mentioned acts have gotten it wrong.

Singing is an integral part of a female rappers career, the ability to switch between hip-hop and RnB is the door way to career longevity(even male rappers do sing these days, you catch what am saying?).  As a female artist we want to see emotions flow, and how best to achieve this other than singing a song.  Ability to sing is an automatic invitation to carry hooks on many other artists’ joints, which is more playtime for them.

When you listen to Nicki minaj’s albums till date-there’s no telling she’s having the most lucrative career (as she has surpassed many other female acts that had been in the game)  you can really get a hold of the whole point am making.

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cynthia morgan

Although she does rap, dance hall, the Edo born Cynthia Morgan got the singing thing going for her I think.  Her first single after being signed under Jude Okoye (p square) northside inc, a song titled Don’t break my heart has successfully brought her back into the game. After falling into oblivion just after her brief introduction in Jhybo’s track ejo le fero.

In the end we love all our female emcees, the kind of culture they operate in alone is enough to discourage or kill off their career, but for perseverance and tenacity we thank all of them for making a statement.